Manhattan Prep GRE Blog

Ultimate Guide to the At-Home GRE

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GRE at home

As of April 2, ETS is allowing test takers in certain countries to take the official GRE from home. We will address all of the important details in this post; you can also learn more about this option and determine your eligibility on the official GRE website.

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How to Form an Online GRE Study Group

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GRE study group

In this time of social distancing, studying for the GRE in some ways should be easier for many of us—we no longer have to fight FOMO, because we don’t get to go out, anyway. But in other ways it can be harder. Being alone and/or indoors for extended periods of time can feel isolating, and the situation that has given rise to the social distancing causes anxiety for many of us.

My plan this week was to write a post on how to create an in-person study group, but since that’s not possible (nor a good idea) at the present date, I’ve decided to share ideas for how you can create an online GRE study group. 

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How to Actually Do Combinatorics Problems on the GRE

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Combinatorics on the GRE

Combinatorics—it’s a word none of us can say and none of us had ever heard of before we started studying for the GRE. It’s a fancy word that just means “the number of possibilities” or “all the ways something could go” (my definitions). 

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Why A Review Log is Vital to Your GRE Prep

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GRE review logLike many folks these days, I’m catching up on some TV shows, but I’m still teaching too. For anyone out there studying for the GMAT, LSAT, or GRE, there’s a valuable lesson that I want to share with you that I learned recently from, of all places, a TV show. It’s about the danger of failing to review your work, and the associated importance of keeping a detailed review log. That show is called “Masterchef,” hosted by celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay.

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My GRE Was Canceled. Now What?

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GRE canceled

If your test was postponed due to COVID-19, you may find yourself anxious and/or unsure about what to do from here. In this post I want to share with you your current options and address common concerns/questions. 

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Coronavirus GRE Updates

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coronavirus gre updates

Update: ETS will allow stay-at-home official testing.

At Manhattan Prep, we’ve been closely monitoring the effects of COVID-19 in our communities. This is an immensely difficult time and our thoughts are with all those who are impacted. Our top commitment is to the health and safety of our employees, our students, and our partners.  

We know that COVID-19 is deeply disrupting your life right now, and it has the potential to delay your long-term goals for your career and education. You can still study effectively, though, and it’s also fine to delay your studies if needed—the GRE isn’t going anywhere and neither are we. Read more

How To Take a GRE Practice Test

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gre practice test

Regularly taking GRE practice tests (but not too many!) is how you find out whether your studying is working and what to focus on next. But in order to take a practice test perfectly, you need a bit of…practice.

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How to Maximize Your Vocab Prep

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manhattan-prep-gre-vocabulary-prep-tips-best-strategy

What are the best ways to study vocabulary on the GRE? I’ve compiled my top strategies for getting the most out of your GRE Vocab prep.

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Using the Computer to Your Advantage on the GRE

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computer GRE

The fact that the GRE is administered on a computer is tough for a number of reasons—you can’t mark up the passages on the Reading Comprehension sections, for instance. It can also be visually tiring to stare intently at a screen for four hours (though many of us are used to this from doing so at work all day). 

But there are also reasons why taking a test on the computer can be a good thing. Let’s take a look. Read more

How Much Can You Expect Your GRE Score to Go Up with Studying?

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GRE score increase

As a GRE instructor, I get this question a lot. I’ll start by just sharing what I see, and note that this is just my experience: most students go up 5-8 points with study. That said, there are also students who go up 15 points, so I don’t mean the 5-8 to be read as a cap or threshold.

Now that that’s out of the way, I’ll state the obvious, which is that every person is different. So many factors play into this question, including where you start, how much you study, and how you study. But since you already know that, I want to unpack each of these in order to answer the question more specifically to you

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